Chinese



Bohea . . . Happy Establishment

So called after two ranges of hills, Fu-Kien or Fo-Kien

Congou . . . Labor

Named so at Amoy from the labor in preparing it.

Sou chong . . . Small Kind

Hyson . . . Flourishing Spring

Pe-koe . . . White Hair

So called because only the youngest leaves are gathered,

which still have the delicate down--white hair--on

the surface.

Pou-chong . . . Folded Tea

So called at Canton after the manner of picking it.



Brick Tea--prepared in Central China from the commonest sorts

of tea, by soaking the tea refuse, such as broken leaves,

twigs, and dust, in boiling water and then pressing them into

moulds. Used in Siberia and Mongolia, where it also serves

as a medium of exchange. The Mongols place the bricks,

when testing the quality, on the head, and try to pull

downward over the eyes. They reject the brick as worthless

if it breaks or bends.





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